Dual Wielding Pens

I’m actually writing two pieces concurrently at the moment. They are not related, and they don’t overlap thematically except in broad terms and themes; as noted previously, it’s hard for me to write a strictly happy story. The mystery of why remains such, and I’m not going to investigate it too much. So how does writing two things at once help me keep my drive?

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Getting Emotional.

I am proof reading for a friend, which is fun and educational as she’s writing a Young Adult fiction piece and because she’s a woman, so brings a different outlook. The Young Adult fiction part is something I’m slowly adapting to in my feedback – the awkward boy-girl relationships, the idea of friendship being very important juxtaposed to the protagonist not having any friends/being popular, and several other facets that I would not include in my current manuscript because we have different target audiences. This is, importantly, not to say that young adults cannot enjoy non-YA fiction, nor that adults can’t enjoy young adult fiction. All it means is that the story is directed specifically at one of those groups, and as with any form of entertainment fiction must be tailored for its intended audience.

Killing Isn’t Heroic

I’m hoping my sequel’s prologue as gripping as the first book’s, as I’ve just rounded that off this morning, although topping my last one for shock factor is difficult in today’s world. This is mostly due to the devaluing of murder that happens in Western media and fiction, so that’s less of a powerful option than what I did in the first book.

Get Writing – An Action Packed Addition!

I’ve now finished my first novel! And by ‘finished’ I mean I wrote the end and most of the story has been drafted out. I think I have 10% more to do, corridor and elevator scenes for the most part, to match everything up and then I’m ready to submit it to places! How very, very exciting!

Amongst all the excitement that’s brought on I have to say my grand finale, the great and climatic action sequence that brought everything to an end in an exciting crescendo of violence, action and heart pounding excitement, was actually pretty difficult to write. And that’s because it involved violence, that key part of most films and books people think is easy to write, easy to make exciting because it’s something that gets the pulse pounding – indeed, our pulses were designed to pound when we needed to do something violent. So why was it so difficult?

Get Writing and Get Sectioned: Corridors and Lifts

Well, it’s been a while since I’ve written about writing hasn’t it! Have I finished my novel as a result? Sadly not, but it’s certainly on the way at forty seven thousand words. I’d like to have got more done, but March and April have been busy months for me with work so I’m slightly behind on my target. What’s really helped me stay focused and on target is a technique borrowed from one of my friends at Mightier than the Sword.

Get Writing – Still Starting: Shadows Over Brimstone: The Journey Continues.

I’m going to continue my story/adventure with our heroes of the Wild West – last time we saw them Hank, Saphi and Javier were looking to blow some demon-things to kingdom come. That segment began the story, or rather explained why the story was taking place. There wasn’t really much in the way of plot besides what I’ve written above, however. It is often assumed that ‘story’ and ‘plot’ are synonymous – this is a terrible mistake to make while writing. Plot without story is a step by step break down of things that happen which can brush over subtle events or character development, and makes plot twists either hard to hide or worryingly close to breaking a reader’s suspension of disbelief (Deus Ex Machima). Story without plot has no direction or purpose and will rarely be enough to keep someone reading for an entire novel.